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Tim
Limited Member
Posts: 22

In love with the Character Nipple or in love with David's portrayal of him?  I cannot say that I have ever heard of the film before, although John Hurt looks very familiar as his character.  From the short clips that I watched on youtube, the film looks like one I must look out for.  David does comedy really well, I have never seen him like this. He has some Alan Bennet-like charm with a dark side. 

I don't know if you take much notice of numbers, but I do feel that the dance floor may fill up a little in the coming months.  Especially so, toward the end of the year, when Mary Poppin's "pops back" and Mr Warner as Admiral Boom, presumably will be delivering his lines from the roof tops.

February 16, 2018 at 4:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

In love with David's portrayal of him- he is the character who comes out best. Nerdy and eccentric, 'disputatious', as Malcolm calls him,he is essentially harmless and more grounded in reality despite his rambling monologues (he is a writer after all). Most importantly he doesn't take Malcolm's grandstanding seriously. The other two in Malcolm's revolutionary party are Wick, played by John McEnery, who is a malevolent shit stirrer, and Irwin, who is a gormless yes-man with some hidden aggression. Nipple treats it like a game, to the others it's far more serious. No dictator can allow a dissenter in the ranks.


I got my copy from Amazon. It's a must-see in my opinion. John Hurt is crazy wonderful as Malcolm. 


Have you never seen The Man With Two Brains? David does wonderful comedy in that. It's as if the director told him, "this character is nuts. Go for it." :D


I think it's the dark side that makes him so fascinating. There's a brittle quality to even the 'goodest' of the good guy roles he's played. I imagine him made of spun sugar- beautiful but delicate. Of course he must have a resilient streak to be an actor in the first place-- therein lies the juxtaposition.


And of course I'm a lovestruck fool. 8)


Oh I do hope the dance floor fills up. David deserves it. I nearly died watching that clip on the home page, Bonjour Lobey... I never watched Freakazoid (too busy raving it up in the 90s) Had I known David voiced the Lobe I'd have been glued. 


Can't wait for his Admiral Boom. I love that he's still working. And thanks for keeping the forum active while we wait for the others' return. Rally the Warner Army once more unto the breach, dear friends!


"After the revolution we'll all have to dress like you. It'll be the 'eight of fashion." - Dennis Charles Nipple to a disgruntled Malcolm Scrawdyke





February 16, 2018 at 5:47 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

There are so many films that I need to chase up.   When the megga-bucks (probably £7.50 ph) start rolling in, I will have to invest in a few DVDs.   I am rather keen to get my hands on Time After Time, as the subject of changing things being made possible because of time travel fascinates me.  Not really literally, but as an allegorical analogy of deep reflection.   I made one short film (30min) on the subject a few years ago and despite any conscious decision on my part, find myself doing something remarkably similar again.

From the clips I have seen from Time After Time, I am not convinced by Malcolm Mcdowell's H G Wells, and based on this, feel that it could be a real weakness of the film.  This is not his fault, but he looks more like John-boy Walton in fancy dress and is very difficult to take him seriously as a result.   Which reminds me, have you watched  Blue Borsalino yet?   

As for Emoticons/Smilies/Emojis, what would be a fitting  "Warner" emoticon? 

Believing that David would be phenominal as Scrooge, I have inadvertently set for myself a very high bar for which anything less, will be somewhat lacking.  This is all in my mind as an ideal of course, but it has me analysing why I not only think such, but how I can mimick or manufacture the depth of character that he undoubtedly would.  I won't, of course I won't be fully successful, and it would not be me "doing" David Warner "doing" Scrooge, just me trying to capture an essence of ambiguity which he does so (at least seemingly) effortlessly.  All the while, enjoying the puruit.  

  

February 17, 2018 at 5:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

Mega bucks? The worst thing NatWest ever did was give me a credit card while I was unemployed. Ker-ching! 


Your thoughts on Time After Time are interesting. I know exactly what you mean about Malcolm McDowell as H.G. Wells. Next to David's chilling Jack the Ripper, he does appear everso slightly ineffectual. The movie was marketed wrongly as a 'chase thriller' with the emphasis on the Ripper when it's really a romance between H.G. and Amy, ditzily played by Mary Steenburgen who ended up marrying McDowell in real life. I mean it's bloody obvious they're actually in love by the way they simper at each other and snog with their mouths fully open... steady on, Herbert old boy! We can all see you! Didn't realise I was watching an actual sex scene! I prefer not to be a voyeur, thanks!


But it's also very delightful and very watchable. There's a sweet quality to Amy, H.G. is definitely in LURVE, and then you have the bloodthirsty antics of Mr. Warner who does not give a single damn. I mean, women die in this lovely, romantic story, make no mistake about that. 


David as John Leslie Stephenson/JTR was genius casting. I've never seen cold psychopathy played so well. I don't know what he does but he shuts off the human part of himself and leaves an animalistic, instinctual being that just follows his impulses without a shred of conscience or remorse. He strikes that nerve inside a woman that triggers her own downfall. 'I can redeem him, I know I can.'  But to fall for him is to ensure your own demise. 


McDowell apparently asked to audition for H.G. Wells to show that he could play good guys. 


Anyway do try and get hold of Time After Time and Little Malcolm, if only to marvel at the same man playing both a lovable eccentric dreamer AND a cold, ruthless killer. Complete opposite ends of the spectrum.


Ah, the Scrooge bar hs been set high my friend. Even David with his twelve foot long legs may have trouble getting over it! One thing is guaranteed. His sad face WILL have me in tears before the opening credits have even finished. 


A fitting Warner emoticon would be a wolf with a crooked smile and a 'guess whether I'm joking or not' look in his eye. Someone get on it! Wait... I used to be an artist. Maybe I'll have a go. 


"I'm a walking seismograph of sensual innuendo."

February 18, 2018 at 5:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

Being "Truly 100%" objective, means you could never be a "fan" per se, as you will always be given to a little bias.  Especially so, is it the case when your all smushy for the lad.  I must say though, that from my point of view, and this is in no way underplaying the significance of his consummate acting skills, I wonder just how much of his undeniable and possibly unequalled ability to covey depth of character, is because he just has that sort of face?

There is a lot to be said about ambiguity, contradiction and mystery and Mr Warner's face is blessed with a fair share of all of them.  Quite unlike an emoticon which with a few simple blobs says happy, sad, puzzled, shocked etc.... David's face, almost has a language of its own, a smile has a reason and a downturned mouth a secret.  Charles Dickens' novello has more than a few ambiguous and contradictory moments of its own.  You cannot put your finger on anything and it is more interesting and enduring for it.  It is no wonder, that it has ignited the imagination of so many filmmakers over the years to keep churning out version after version.  Sadly, their visions have all fallen short and they have all missed a fundamentally imperative element.  I am saying this of course just to make a point, but actually, I really think they all have.

Great quotes by the way.  I came across a few more snippets from Little Malcolm.  I see what you mean about D C N, David is so funny, absolutely brilliant.


February 18, 2018 at 7:04 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

His natural voice could be significant in this also.  Not just his talking voice but his naturally expressive demeanour.  As an actor, I think he is blessed with a pretty impressive set of tools and as a great craftsman, he knows how to put them to use well.

February 19, 2018 at 4:35 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

Yes, yes and thrice yes. Everything you say is true, and very articulately put. 


Maybe having a crush on him does mean I'm biased somewhat, but I'd know if he was a crap actor and he most definitely is not. I've admired him for years but he's under the radar so I gave little thought to him unless I saw him in something and then I'd go, "oh look, it's David Warner!" However I was discussing films with someone on facebook and they mentioned David's decapitation scene in the Omen. I promptly went to YouTube and the entire film was there so I watched it and it was like a switch going on. Suddenly I was swooning over the man. 


After that, I spent much time searching for snippets of other things he'd been in. I had a vague memory of loving Morgan: A Suitable Case For Treatment, and I adore Time Bandits but there were all these myriad other roles, characters so different from each other, and of course that mournful face, as you so beautifully put, almost has a language of its own. And his hair- for some reason I love his hair. And his odd way of walking which comes from breaking both his feet in a mysterious accident back in '70 or '71 that he refuses to talk about. He just piles mystery on top of mystery while giving you just enough to set your mind working. By all accounts he's a painfully shy man, and yet he was called to a very public profession. He's a conundrum. And of course my opinions might just be coloured by schoolgirl longing, but that helps me spot things. I have no regrets!


I am not as familiar with Dickens as you are, as I was forced to read Great Expectations in school and hated it. I'd think differently now, but my brain at that age couldn't cope with the length of it and I just wanted to smack Philip Pirrip around the chops. I haven't even read A Christmas Carol as written by Dickens. I've only seen film adaptations. Perhaps it's time I did. 


David was woefully underused in Titanic. An actor of his calibre having to chase Leo and Kate around, I'm sure there were far better things he could have been doing, like driving the ship! They wouldnae have hit the iceberg if Captain Warner was in charge.


"Repeat after me. I, Dennis Nipple..."

"That's not my name!"

"Well what is it then"

"It's Dennis CHARLES Nipple!"






February 19, 2018 at 6:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

You know! I really need to watch Titanic again and am intending to do so, with the intent of analysing David's performance in it.  He was great in it from memory.  It is amasing that although slight in build, not for a second do I think that Jack could have got the better of him (was that scene cut, where Jack gives him a beating during a chase through the diningroom?  I can just imagine Cameron thinking "Yeah, right, can we really push the boundries of believability that far?"), he was a far too wily and formidable a force, for something less than a bullet take him down with such ease.

I have a big problem with his name though, Spicer Lovejoy sounds like a porn star.  Is his name even mentioned in the film, or was it coined purely for the sake of the closing credits?  I read that David didn't enjoy the experience of working with the director.  Was it post production spite, following a badly received exchange of artistic differences?  Spicer Lovejoy??????? Don't tell me you like it?



February 21, 2018 at 4:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

Actually I don't like Titanic, the whole Jack/Rose business leaves me cold, it's almost as if the ship itself was a supporting actor. Not a fan of Leo or Kate, nothing personal :)


Spicer Lovejoy (crazy name, crazy guy!)  deserved more screen time. As for Leo DiCaprio beating him up,yeah, right!! I like that deleted scene, but you're right, no way would a fierce, ex-Pinkerton detective get taken down that easily. I also don't think Lovejoy would bother himself with a piece of jewellery when his life was in danger. That whole scene is too far fetched but cutting it meant losing more of David, so THANKS James Cameron, thanks for nuthin'. You can see it on YouTube though, I think it's included on the DVD release. 


Speaking of David's slight build, Spicer Lovejoy does not come across as a slight man. Yet more evidence of his superior acting skillz. He can make himself look bigger!


As for the moniker. I've heard of Spicer as a surname but not a first name. The irony of  'Lovejoy' is that he's so dour and grumpy. (But yes of course I love him. God, you must think me an awful eejit.)


David was in another Titanic film. 'S.O.S. Titanic', a TV movie made in 1979. He survived in that one, and has the distinction of having sailed that ship twice. Two maiden voyages! 


Apparently David was uncomfortable with Billy Zane, I don't know why. James Cameron wanted everyone on set all the time every day in case he needed them. David found it inconvenient. He slept during the day and filmed at night. But he's very civil in interviews, you'll never hear him saying a bad word about anyone. 


By the way, give me a kick up the arse if my swooning gets too much. I try not to let it cloud my judgment, but... crushes add colour to life, don't you think?


"What could possibly be funny?" - Spicer Lovejoy as the ship is sinking

February 21, 2018 at 7:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

I didn't mean like the film, I meant, like the name Spicer Lovejoy.  Actually, the film was more successful than many would admit.  I don't mean on the recieved accolades or box office takings however.  I mean, that amid all the Hollywood cheese that everyone seems to berate, Cameron cleverly orchestrates the story in such a way, that even with prior knowledge, the viewer, like many on board the doomed vessel, don't feel like the ship will actually sink.

Yes, I agree that Mr Warner gives no inkling of his slight frame and it is a great testiment to his acting prowess.  It is also, in no small way, greatly pronouced by good direction and editing. 

It was funny that you said the Titanic would not have sunk in his hands, because David hasn't always boarded the safest of "ships" to say the least.  Whether the offers were there or not or the size and pressures of certain roles have made him take a wide birth I have no idea but, this is the only reason I can imagine, that there is still room for the "old vase" on the mantlepiece.  Gongs and silverwear are one thing and there is a heavy bias, but I feel David has stopped a few ships going down at the head. 

February 21, 2018 at 10:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

Oh, the joy of non verbal communication. Sorry I mistook you. I do think the name is a bit odd but he's had a few odd ones in his career (Alfred Necessiter, Sark, Evil Genius, Dennis Charles Nipple) that it doesn't really register as such!


I'm afraid I didn't gel with the romance aspect of Titanic but I appreciate what a huge success it was. The mechanics involved, the sheer size of the sets, the precise attention to detail, none of it can be faulted. It's interesting that you say nobody expected the ship would actually sink. We sit on our comfy chairs watching events unfold but imagine actually being there. Swamped in icy water, thousands of people in varying stages of panic, what the films don't show you are horrible injuries and actual dead people, heavy items crashing around smashing people into pulp. There were kids watching it who didn't even know it was a true story and that Titanic was going to sink no matter what. 


Good directors, actors, writers etc. make a thing look effortless. CGI is unfortunately rather noticeable but if the story is good enough then you can accept it. I'm old school in my preferences. One of my favourite films is The Straight Story, the old man riding across America on a lawnmower. I could have happily watched that all night. (Even without David in it! Gasp!)


I've found many articles and interviews about David on my travels round the interwebz. He was a shy lad who became very famous very quickly when he was cast as Hamlet in 1965. A few years later he developed stage fright. It became so serious he couldn't even be in a theatre. He had an accident in Italy and smashed both heels and realised he was having a nervous breakdown. He credits Sam Peckinpah as literally getting him back on his feet again, for Straw Dogs in '72. The stage fright persisted for thirty years, meaning that some of his contemporaries such as Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen, became more widely known. He married an American and went to live in the US and basically said yes to every screen role whether film or TV. The wonderful thing about him is the variety of his work and the fact he's worked solidly for fifty years and is not high and mighty at all. Look at all the smaller projects like Blue Borsalino and Wizard. He loves helping new talent get onto the ladder. Take heart!


He does have an Emmy Award which he won for his role as Pomponius Falco in the TV miniseries Masada. 


He's one of those actors who elevates a film just by being in it. He will always be watchable even if the rest of it isn't. I'd say that even if I didn't have a crush on him. 


I have such great admiration for people who end up doing the thing they were born to do. Many of us tumble off the path at some point in our journey and wander through the scrub for years. People like David can often inspire us to get back on track. 


"I don't know whether we've got the heir to the Thorn millions here, or Jesus Christ himself."- Keith Jennings, the Omen



February 22, 2018 at 6:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

Jules at February 22, 2018 at 6:04 AM

Oh, the joy of non verbal communication. Sorry I mistook you. I do think the name is a bit odd but he's had a few odd ones in his career (Alfred Necessiter, Sark, Evil Genius, Dennis Charles Nipple) that it doesn't really register as such!


I'm afraid I didn't gel with the romance aspect of Titanic but I appreciate what a huge success it was. The mechanics involved, the sheer size of the sets, the precise attention to detail, none of it can be faulted. It's interesting that you say nobody expected the ship would actually sink. We sit on our comfy chairs watching events unfold but imagine actually being there. Swamped in icy water, thousands of people in varying stages of panic, what the films don't show you are horrible injuries and actual dead people, heavy items crashing around smashing people into pulp. There were kids watching it who didn't even know it was a true story and that Titanic was going to sink no matter what. 


Good directors, actors, writers etc. make a thing look effortless. CGI is unfortunately rather noticeable but if the story is good enough then you can accept it. I'm old school in my preferences. One of my favourite films is The Straight Story, the old man riding across America on a lawnmower. I could have happily watched that all night. (Even without David in it! Gasp!)


I've found many articles and interviews about David on my travels round the interwebz. He was a shy lad who became very famous very quickly when he was cast as Hamlet in 1965. A few years later he developed stage fright. It became so serious he couldn't even be in a theatre. He had an accident in Italy and smashed both heels and realised he was having a nervous breakdown. He credits Sam Peckinpah as literally getting him back on his feet again, for Straw Dogs in '72. The stage fright persisted for thirty years, meaning that some of his contemporaries such as Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen, became more widely known. He married an American and went to live in the US and basically said yes to every screen role whether film or TV. The wonderful thing about him is the variety of his work and the fact he's worked solidly for fifty years and is not high and mighty at all. Look at all the smaller projects like Blue Borsalino and Wizard. He loves helping new talent get onto the ladder. Take heart!


He does have an Emmy Award which he won for his role as Pomponius Falco in the TV miniseries Masada. 


He's one of those actors who elevates a film just by being in it. He will always be watchable even if the rest of it isn't. I'd say that even if I didn't have a crush on him. 


I have such great admiration for people who end up doing the thing they were born to do. Many of us tumble off the path at some point in our journey and wander through the scrub for years. People like David can often inspire us to get back on track. 


"I don't know whether we've got the heir to the Thorn millions here, or Jesus Christ himself."- Keith Jennings, the Omen



"what the films don't show you are horrible injuries and actual dead people":o  That is method acting gone a bit to far.  Seriously, I know exactly what you mean and couldn't agree with you more on many counts.  Sadly, the budget is beyond the independants and the large studios agenda has more to do with arses on seats and fatter wallets at the end of the day  than "smack in the guts" true to life drama.  This is one reason I think he did rather well.  As an artist, I can say this in the all enveloping sense beit that You, Mr. C and I all know the power of complimentaries,  what he did was make a saccharine contrast in the subplot of Rose and Jack.  Anyway, enough about him, I am sure he has someone giving him some "toffee" on a website somewhere else.

David saying yes to "anything" I am sure is not absolutely true, but incredably insightful perhaps.  It reminds me of an addage adopted by many successful people and highlighted in the 2008 film YESMAN with Jim Carey.  So many, for valid reasons mind, play very safe in their choices.  Choose to holiday in the same place, choose the same make of car etc.... all because they were or are happy with their earlier decision.  Saying YES to "anything", takes you places you would never choose.  I personally belong to the later, I have neither the guts or decision making capacity to choose my own path and consequently find, that I do "wander through the scrub" until something comes along like an oncoming juggernaut and smacks me in a different direction.  To say YES is a simple decision, I must adopt it.     


Mr. Warner's many roles over the years, certainly have been a mixed bag, and although many of his villianous roles spring to mind in connection with his name, you could hardly call him typecast.  I think the reason these roles do stand out is because they DO standout.  I think I told you how his Captain Sawyer left me affected long after the finishing credits.

 

February 23, 2018 at 6:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

James Cameron should have asked the nearest morgue to send over some cadavers. Imagine one of those bobbing up in front of you. Won't be singing 'My Heart Will Go On" then, will ye?


Imagine being trapped inside as the ship plummets two miles to the sea bed. We've turned Titanic into a romantic legend. Each individual trapped in his or her own thoughts, each one dying alone, miles from land, even with others around. I give it a lot of thought. I still pray for those souls. 


The film certainly resonated with young women. Fanfiction is full of 'what if' stories. What if Jack lived? What if they had children? Girls who cried for days when Leo went to sleep with the fishes. Titanic has certainly done well and continues to do so. Wasn't it just admitted into a 'movies hall of fame' archive?


Bums on seats are more important than ever in these days of Hulu and Netflix. I can't remember the last time I went to the pictures. I think it was Brokeback Mountain at FACT where you can take your drinks in and sit on sofas. Other than that, it's DVDs or Prime or some such. 


He did say yes to everything! Especially in the 80s and 90s! That's why he's so amazing and everyone loves him. His conversation can go from Shakespeare to Python to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Batman the Animated Series in the same breath. Not to mention his dozens and dozens of TV appearances. Not to mention scaring even the most ardent of his female fans half to death with his chilling portrayal of Jack the Ripper. He WILL kill you! Then doing a full 360 and being sweetness personified as Bob Cratchit. 


And he LOVES being asked about Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! He made some good friends on some of those weirder, 'lesser' movies. we only see the end result. Sure you already know that the best film in the world can have the most miserable atmosphere on set. I was a lowly extra in The Four Feathers and got to work on the Cutty Sark for two weeks and see the mayhem and madness involved in a big budget film (that flopped). Every day was fresh and exciting for me because I'd never done it before. Actors have different memories than we do. They won't recall a scene but they'll remember the catering (everyone remembers the catering) or that one person that royally pissed them off. I even spotted Heath Ledger briefly but I have better memories of messing about with my pals.


Mr. Warner regards himself as a man whose job it is to act and says he is a 'recovering workaholic'. He brings to mind Aesop's fable about the oak tree and the reed, he being the reed, of course. He may appear slight but he's not gonna break, not ever. 


I too fell off the path years ago. I used to work with a small group of comic book artists. All I wanted to do was illustrate as a career. But I didn't have the guts to go self employed and eventually fell into 'regular' full time employment. And the years passed, and they passed, until one day my mojo for drawing was gone completely. I still don't have it back. I'm still in the scrub, but I do enjoy looking at the work of other artists.


Have you been a director for a long time? The director is the one who MAKES the picture, knows the characters and tells the story. He or she is the one to ask about your favourite scene, except we like to ask the actors because they're the ones we're most familiar with. They're the face of the project.


I did a stage craft course many years ago and thoroughly enjoyed working behind the scenes. I could never be an actor but I'll readily prepare the stage for someone else and watch them shine. That's another direction I wish I'd pursued further but I always seem to return to my default setting. 


I haven't seen his Captain Sawyer. But everything you say rings true. He does villainy very well. He can make his eyes go cold, his jaw tense and determined. And then there's the calculating sneer... he's getting ready to pin you like a butterfly and there's nothing you can do about it. (Except take a cold shower!!)


He is simply wonderful. To paraphrase Forrest Gump, he's like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get. 


On that note I'll end another ridonkulously long missive and sally forth about my day. Good god Im like one of those Redditors who says things  like, "Forsooth, my good lady, allow me to commence my iterations."


You wot m8... 


Right. I'm off. 8)


February 24, 2018 at 5:45 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

 If I was or considered myself anything of a director, I would have had no hesitation in contacting David's agent a month ago.  David simply would have been brilliant as Scrooge, and you, along with many others, could have been checking out the evidence in the not too distant future.  Unfortunately, I have never been a pursuer of anything more ambitious than trying to keep my life on the rails.  Film making for me, is mearly a medium in which I can collectively exorcise my various artistic leanings.  A single "basket" for all my "eggs" so to speak.  I love the challenges and the direction imposed by the theme.  Whereas real filmmakers are focused on doing it right and investing a lot of time and money in making it so,  I derive the most satisfaction from doing the exact opposite.  Pursuing the alchemic possibilities of proving you can get "blood" or something that looks like it anyway, from a "stone". 

Film making is evolving toward being more scientific than artistic and being judged upon it.  In my mind and purely for my own self-gratification, I am leading my own revolution,  which, is not only my way of directing the subject away from all this self-indulgent twaddle, but a tidy segue, I think, to tell you that I watched Little Malcolm and his Struggle Against the Eunuchs last night.

I stayed at my eldest sons house and following a conversation that started with Scrooge, moved to David and eventually ended up in him subscribing to BFI Player.   It was great to watch it and share a few beers with my son.  I was very much my sort of film, brimming with great dialogue and captivating performances without relying on choice locations, special effects and pretty colours to keep you interested.   The sound was a bit off at times and personally I think 5 minutes more of D C N somewhere, would have been just the right amount of "salt".  I will definitely endovour to see it again.   

Not seen Mutiny or Retribution?  I am shocked.   Hornblower was a great series anyway, but with Mr Warner as Captain Sawyer on board, these two episodes in my mind, provide what must be one of his most commanding ( I couldn't resist the pun) performances. 

I would like to know what an aficionado thinks?

February 25, 2018 at 10:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

The world needs less self-indulgent twaddle and more of Dennis Charles Nipple. And people who think like you do. 


I am absolutely thrilled that you finally watched Little Malcolm, and delighted that there's such a thing as BFI Player, I have another friend who wants to see it, she's intrigued by this Nipple chap I keep going on about. 


I do agree, there should have been more of Nipple, but I'm glad he was out of the picture by the time the shit hit the fan. Because it got very serious very quickly when they began beating up the girl. Then again had Nipple been there, he would have stopped it. He didn't hate women, the others did. 


Beers! *clink* Glad you got to catch up with your son and bond over the magnificent David Warner. 


This is going to be woefully brief because I'm having a wisdom tooth extracted in one hour precisely. The surprise being that I had a wisdom tooth at all. 


I shall be back later to discuss a certain little film called The Island, which I've just ordered from Amazon. Pirates aplenty, David as their villainous leader, and Michael Caine not so much blowing the bloody doors off as trying to stop his kid from being brainwashed by hooligans. David said it's 'a load of old rubbish'. I can't wait. 


PS: I'll see if I can find an aficionado for you. (As the old Groucho joke goes, this is so simple a five year old child can do it. Somebody get me a five year old child!)

February 26, 2018 at 6:47 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
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Posts: 24

Well, I survived my tooth being ripped out and woke up to a blanket of snow which has put me in A Christmas Carol mood. I also signed up for a free trial with BFI Player and watched Little Malcolm while wrapped in my best blankie to take my mind off the pain. Fabulous stuff. Can't thank you enough for the info.


The scene where they put Nipple on trial has an 'et tu, Brute?' feel to it. There are parts of the film that remind you of its play origins, you can imagine Hurt and Warner on stage doing that scene. There's probably a metaphor about the hidden room that Malcolm had never been in before. He's squatting in this big empty building with all these undiscovered rooms, it's a metaphor for the mind, I think. He finds all these hidden aspects of himself and becomes more and more tyrannical. Nipple is the last part of himself that makes sense and so he has to go.


Nipple's dignified exit marks the end of Malcolm's humanity.


I was also thinking how lovely it was that you watched the film with your son over a few beers. That is literally the best way to watch ANYTHING.


February 27, 2018 at 4:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
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Posts: 22

Ooh! you are so deep.  Actually, like the idea that films are more than superficial.  In a short film I made called Capture, exposition and meaning was scattered thoughout, being in everything but dialogue, as there was none.  Unfortunately, those who have remarked on it, hadn't a clue what the film was about, some describing a film I would not recognise had I not known what they were referring to.   Anything like that in Little Malcolm or any other film, will undoubtedly pass straight over my head, as I have the attention span of a newt and the understanding of something even more lowly.  I just like the pretty pictures, the sets and great costumes etc...  Seriously, I can't see the wood for the trees when it comes to movies.

Writing this, makes me think of the corduroy jacket scene.  D C Nipple, sorry, I must say this.  Most people will identify him as the obvious idiot of the piece, being deluded in life and plainly wrong in his argument.  Other things in the film support such a conclusion, why is it then......

that I have the tendancy to take his side and believe him?  



February 27, 2018 at 7:48 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
Limited Member
Posts: 24

That is the initial impression you get from Nipple. He's argumentative for the sake of it. It's downright annoying at times. Tell him the grass is green and he'll disagree. Then he goes off on his flights of fancy. Ann Gedge says of him when she's describing Malcolm's friends, "He's only here because he's not somewhere else." Nipple lives in his own bubble like Walter Mitty. But he's not a bad chap. He isn't filled with repressed rage and martyrdom like Malcolm. He's not impotent around women. He doesn't hate anyone, he's not seeking revenge or retribution. That becomes apparent quite quickly. "I'm going for a pee," he says, meaning he's had enough and he's off. The others are loyal to Malcolm but Nips is his own man. 


Is Capture available to watch anywhere? 


At the end of the corduroy jacket scene they start arguing about whether the chippy is on the South Parade or not. We think that Nipple is just being disputatious but it turns out the chippy WAS on the South Parade. Again, that's just a little hint that Nipple isn't completely away with the faeries and Malcolm isn't always right. 


Nipple is not afraid to take the piss out of Malcolm. When Malcolm is directing them into position for staging the raid on the art gallery, Nipple points at one of Malc's paintings and says "I'll look at this thing" and laughs. Maybe he genuinely doesn't realise how personally Malcolm will take it, or he does and says it anyway. During the trial scene it appears that they've known each other for a long time, and Nipple at least, valued the friendship. Nipple enjoys verbal jousting and probably thought that's what many of their arguments were. An exercise in wit and vocabulary. Little did he know that Malcolm was festering over every word. 

February 28, 2018 at 4:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tim
Limited Member
Posts: 22

Thanks for the insight, I look foward to watching it again, which I definately will.

As for Capture, I have had little interest in uploading it to Youtube or Vimeo or publicising it in anyway.  As is true of most of my artistic endevours, it was made primarily for me.  When an idea plants itself in my head, it has to be vented, and film is a great and all embracing medium in which to work.

I hope that you enjoy The Island.  I had never heard of it, but having looked into it, you will either love it or hate it.  Reviews while mixed, seem to be statistically stacked against it.  Apparently, the key to enjoying it is, accepting it for what it is, just sitting back and turning off mentally.  Oh yes! and Mr. Warner of course;)   

February 28, 2018 at 8:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Jules
Limited Member
Posts: 24

Mr. Warner never recommends The Island. He thinks it's rubbish. But having seen clips and reviews, I can tell it's a cult classic. First you have Pirate Dave without a shirt on, then you have him in charge of a wabble of wowdy webels. Throw in a bemused Michael Caine and a scene where he needs to inject 'fresh blood' into the group to counter the effects of in-breeding and is lubed up and straddled by some woman he's only just met. And you have the ingredients for one of those films that is definitely better watched under the influence of alcohol with your mad-as-trousers friends. 


David is in classic villainous mode with the added bonus of scant clothing. 


I will be entirely honest and say that's the only reason I want to watch this film. 


"Find the Maynard man! Cut his throat!"

March 2, 2018 at 9:24 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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